A Poem of Lament

Photo Courtesy of Joshua Eckstein

By Drew Friesen

Published September 1st 2020

Perhaps you ask too much of us
Cloudy judgement condescending 
Around our bleak unfeeling eyes
You’ve gone too far ahead transcending
Til we to you are specks of dust


And where’s the resonance in that?
In the moral inquisition 
You were to be our great ideal
But Christ! the infestation 
If we’re the mice then you’re the rat


But,


I think I feel what you want heard
Though God! it’s hard for me to feel
Perhaps it isn’t just pretending
And it isn’t anymore than real
To scream my sorrow to the Word


 

            Christ is fully God and fully man.[1] Furthermore, while being Holy, He calls to us, “be Holy for I am Holy” (1 Pt. 1:16 ESV). What does it mean for Christ to be our ideal in the quest for a just world? Is he too far ahead to lead us on, or is he too close to us—too human to save? In the end all we can do is cling to him as the revelation of God and pour out our sorrow to the Godman who truly knows what it is to suffer unjustly. 


            The rhyme scheme for this poem is A B C B A, signifying the recapitulation of humanity in the suffering servant. The “Entwined” scheme depicts the lack of order in suffering and chaos, which still bears chiastic structure even as its structure fails to resonate. It is in this dissonance that we cry out to Christ as our ideal for a just world, and it is into this primordial chaos that the Word speaks.

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Footnotes:

            [1] Col. 2:9 ESV, “For in him the whole fullness of deity dwells bodily.”

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